CHRONOS AND KAIROS


Ansel Adams was a famous landscape photographer and environmentalist who showed America its outstanding natural beauty long before tourism flourished. His photos of the American West have been published and reprinted abundantly, especially those of Yosemite National Park.


He said, “Sometimes I do get to places just when God's ready to have someone click the shutter.” [1]

Are there particular times and moments when something exceptional can happen?

The ancient Greeks had two words for time, and Kairos was the second. The first was Chronos, which we still use in words like chronological and anachronism. It refers to clock time – time that can be measured – seconds, minutes, hours, years...

Where Chronos is quantitative, Kairos is qualitative. It measures moments, not seconds. Further, it refers to the right moment, the opportune moment. The perfect moment… The world takes a breath, and in the pause before it exhales, fates can be changed.[2]

Perhaps you are in a season of waiting. You have a dream that you long to fulfill or a prayer that remains unanswered. If you look at the clock, you begin to worry about lost time. But there is a better way of living than as a clock-watcher.

Bishop T.D. Jakes said,

Timing is so important! If you are going to be successful in dance, you must be able to respond to rhythm and timing. It’s the same in the Spirit. People who don’t understand God’s timing can become spiritually spastic, trying to make the right things happen at the wrong time. They don’t get His rhythm – and everyone can tell they are out of step. They birth things prematurely, threatening the very lives of their God-given dreams.[3]

If some of your dreams were fulfilled right now, you would not be ready. You would not be the person you need to be to handle what is to come. The waiting has everything to do with preparing you for what is coming.

The words ‘not yet’ are challenging. Waiting is sometimes harder than working. It is in the prolonging that we learn patience. This is not child’s play for the hopeless or the impulsive.



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